Michael J. Haviland

Michael Haviland approaches real estate transactions and leasing with a detail oriented methodology defined by attentiveness and pragmatism.

Michael J. Haviland

Biography

Michael J. Haviland is an attorney at Earp Cohn P.C. that counsels clients on real estate, corporate, and regulated substances related matters. He enjoys working with a variety of clients ranging from developers to international companies to small business start-ups.

Michael’s experience includes:

• Acquisition and sale of real estate investment properties.

• Commercial and telecommunication leasing.

• Ground-up development negotiations.

• Zoning and land use applications.

• Tangled title issues.

• Entity formation for both domestic and international clients.

• Cannabis growing and manufacturing land use and financing counseling.

In addition to Michael’s above experience, he frequently advises clients on the real-world implications of operating companies as well as purchasing, owning, and managing real estate. This practical approach is thanks in part to being raised in a family of entrepreneurial landlords, which imparted a unique perspective that Michael brings to his work.

After graduating from Villanova University School of Law, Michael moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and then Collingswood, New Jersey, where he now resides with his family. Michael frequently speaks on real estate and cannabis related topics before industry and legal professionals.

 

Riding a motorcycle and writing haiku

Michael J. Haviland

Education

J.D., Villanova University School of Law
B.A., cum laude, Connecticut College

Honors and Affiliations

Dorothy Day Service Award, Villanova University School of Law
Second Place, Pennsylvania Bar Association Intellectual Property Law Section Writing Competition

Bar Admissions

Mr. Haviland is admitted to practice in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Professional Activities

Urban Land Institute

Publications

“Superman and Statutes: The Case for Restructuring the U.S. Legal System and Awarding Copyrights to Authors Behind Works for Hire” (LES, June 2014).

“Knowledge, Necessaries, and Bad Faith: What Department of Environmental Protection v. Danfelt Means for Spousal Liability and Attorney Fee-shifting” (24 Vill. Envtl. L.J. 395, 2013).

“Landlords and Cannabis Clients: How to Handle Commercial Leases with Green Tenants” (Primerus Paradigm, Fall 2016).